Kaleidoscope

Written by Imelda Muller, '17


Tiny shadow forms topple over each other, Crowding around the man and the truck. Rising in swells, Moving toward the wall where he is pinned. Falling smoothly in concert. As the truck teeters on the ledge. The weight of their jostling vibrations, Abrasively declare his fate, and Travel up my arms as the front lens spins in my fingers.

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Al final del día el cuidado del paciente es lo más importante

Written by Jessica Huang, '17


The long line of patients waiting outside the hospital as soldiers guard the entrance, the prayers beginning each morning report, the sharing of patient beds/cribs, and the lack of running water … these are some of the things that stood out to me when I first arrived at Hospital Maternidad Nuestra Señora de la Altagracia (HUMNSA). Everything seemed foreign as I tried to learn the workflow and how to integrate into a medical team in a new country and medical system. However, as my ears acclimated to new medical terms while rounding in a different language, my first impressions developed into a realization of the importance of religion in the Dominican Republic as well as the limited resources and high volume of patients at this public hospital. Inside the walls of this institution, work and teaching truly prioritize patient care.

Olumwa: The Dangers of Complacency in Global Health

Written by Janel Martir, '16, recipient of an honorable mention for the Consortium of Universities for Global Health Essay Contest


“Olumwa?” I asked in my best impersonation of a Lugandan accent. My patient pointed to her belly. She looked as if she had swallowed the moon. She was writhing uncomfortably on her bed in the maternity triage laying on the single sheet of black plastic. I scanned the room one more time to look for any physicians. The interns, called junior officers, were on strike. They had not been paid in 5 months so the strike was a drastic measure to confront the unfairness of their plight. The residents, called senior officers, were taking exams and were studying in the small hallways in Makerere University quizzing each other on clinical technique and treatments.

Global Health Electives Provide Lessons in Patient Advocacy, Health Equity, Humility

Written by Dr. Majid Sadigh, Trefz Family Endowed Chair in Global Health at Western Connecticut Health Network and Director of the Global Health Program at UVM Larner College of Medicine, and Mitra Sadigh, post baccalaureate student in pre-medical studies


For many medical students, training in a resource-limited setting is their first exposure to the way most of the world lives, where nylon gloves are used in place of catheters, where the number of radiation machines in a nation can be counted on one hand, where a bed shortage might mean patients sleep on the floor. Working in this environment requires self-awareness, strength, and humility to accept and then overcome challenges to one’s way of being, thinking, and perceiving the world.