The Uncertainty of Medicine

Written by Melvin Philip, M.D., medical resident at the Greater Danbury Community Health Center Internal Medicine Residency Program


Naggalama has become my “home away from home.” A small community hospital run by Sister Jane, St. Francis Hospital caters to the underprivileged villages of Naggalama and is contained within a small Christian community consisting of a primary and secondary school, a nursery, a church, and housing for hospital staff. The medical director, Dr. Otim, has been our guide and resource in introducing us to the art of medicine in Uganda. The faculty have welcomed us with open arms.

Advertisements

Caring For One Patient, Serving an Entire Community

Written by Rafael Khalitov, M.D., Global Health Scholar from Russia


“Anxious to bring both the year and New Year’s Day into line with the West, Peter decreed that the next new year would begin on January 1 and that the coming year would be numbered 1700… But to blunt the argument of those who said that God could not have made the earth in the depth of winter, Peter invited them “to view the map of the globe and gave them to understand that Russia was not all the world and that what was winter with them was, at the same time, always summer in those places beyond the equator.”
 -Robert K. Massie, Peter the Great: His Life and World
As a graduate of Kazan State Medical University, I am proud that my Alma Mater was among the first Russian institutions to send graduates and residents to medical facilities in other countries. Global health is one of the most powerful tools with which professional horizons can be widened. It reminds us why we chose medicine in the first place.

The Qualities That Make a Surgeon Great

Written by Bryce Bludevich, M.D. '17


He was a young man with a seemingly bright future ahead of him, a university student with a loving family. He was only twenty years old when he came to Mulago Hospital. He was skin and bones by the time he had arrived, his eyes sunken and blank as if he knew the end was in sight. Under his thin bedcovers lay the source of his malady: an open midline incision. The suture lay exposed, along with his spleen and small bowel. His tattered skin crisscrossed over his open abdomen, the edges of his incision well worn. He had multiple enterocutaneous fistulas.

Combating Medicine’s Hidden Curriculum

Written by Stefan Wheat, '18


"But we had forgotten that alongside Orwell's dark vision, there was another - slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley's vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history.” -Neil Postman
My family reached the saddle of Thorung La pass on day fifteen of our twenty-one day trek of the Annapurna Circuit in Nepal, the 300 km trail encircling the Annapurna massif. On day sixteen I turned nine years old, and on day seventeen I developed appendicitis. That first night after I began to develop symptoms, I remember clearly when our sirdar, the leader of our expedition, entered the tent where I was screaming bloody murder—writhing in pain, but perfectly lucid. He sang a very tranquil song in Nepali and proceeded to inform my father—within clear earshot of myself—that he did not think I would survive to reach the nearest hospital. This marked my first experience with poor bedside manner.