Magical Mountain

Dr. Majid Sadigh, Trefz Family Endowed Chair in Global Health at WCHN and Director of Global Health at UVMLCOM


As a physician, I strive to diminish the expanse between myself and those who suffer. It is through enduring pain and suffering helps me better understand and advocate for those in need. The last seven hours of the climb in particular induce all manner of suffering: difficulty breathing, extreme exhaustion, bitter subfreezing temperatures, gusting dusty winds, crushing bone, joint, and chest pain, cramps, severe headache, sore throat, and nausea. These forces battle with you to send you back down to the bottom of the mountain. You fight just to keep your balance.

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Time for Reflection: Global Health Careers

Written by Dr. Stephen Scholand, Site Director at Cho Ray Hospital, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Global Health Program


When I made the decision to pursue medicine, I had thought of medical school as a narrow track. I had no idea about the universe of possibilities that would open up to me as a physician. My role model at the time was my father who worked in a traditional busy internal medicine practice. I saw him put his heart and soul into medicine, and it was very inspiring.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Reader Response, from the Palliative Care Perspective- Part II

Written by Dr. Randi R. Diamond, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine and Director of the Liz Claiborne Center for Humanism in Medicine at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center


In response to a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North.
I have been following the excellent entries in Global Health Diaries on Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health. I am currently here in Uganda seeing palliative care patients and wanted to respond to a recent cases that others have written about, but from the perspective of a palliative care physician.

A Summer in Ho Chi Minh City: Part II

Written by Isabella Kratzer '20


In every department at Cho Ray Hospital, the doctors were kind, generous, and excited to take us out and show us their city. Meeting people's families and friends and seeing their lives beyond work added so much to our experience here and our understanding of what it is to be a doctor in Vietnam. As far as our actual experience in the hospital was concerned, I think the Emergency Department was an incredible introduction to the healthcare system.

A Summer in Ho Chi Minh City: Part I

Written by Isabella Kratzer '20


Knowing neither what I would see in the context of the healthcare setting nor in the city itself, I had no idea what to expect from my first trip to Southeast Asia. Our drive from the airport to the Rainbow Hotel was a bit of a shock to me. I had never seen such intimidating traffic or encountered such large gatherings on the sidewalks, people perched on little plastic stools outside their shops. We got out of the van and wove through the circles of chairs, pulling our bags over the broken tiles and looking down the long street at the layers of awnings, water bottles and plastic tubs piled high beneath them. That kind of open community no longer exists in many places in the United States.

Remembering Naggalama

Written by Nikolas Moring '20


It’s been a few months since I returned from Naggalama. For better or for worse, I made the decision to leave early, and in doing so prioritized my health and well-being. It was not an easy choice. I spent many sleepless nights trying to figure out if I was about to squander away one of the best opportunities I’ve ever been given. It can be challenging to admit that you are not strong enough, not resilient enough, or just not cut out to complete the task set before you. That being said, I left a part of me with the people I met in Uganda, and a big chunk of that lives in St. Francis Hospital.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Reader Response, from the Palliative Care Perspective- Part I

Written by Dr. Randi R. Diamond, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine and Director of the Liz Claiborne Center for Humanism in Medicine at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center


In response to a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North.
I have been following the excellent entries in the Global Health Diaries on Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health. I am currently here in Uganda seeing palliative care patients and wanted to respond to a recent cases that others have written about, but from the perspective of a palliative care physician.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Reader Response

Written by Reverend Professor Luboga


In response to a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North.
It is always difficult for anyone to watch a patient, especially a young one, die. However, it can be particularly emotionally traumatic for a visiting student. I believe the student should desist from doing any such thing as prescribing medication.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Promoting Global Consciousness

Written by Dr. Stephen Winters, and Dr. Robert Kalyesubula, cofounder of the African Community Center for Social Sustainability, Nakaseke, Uganda


From a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North. Please leave us your feedback in the comments section below, and send us ethical dilemmas you would like to see discussed.

I Wish Her Nothing But Peace

Written by Andrew Pham '20


We were wrapping up our first rotation and the second week in the Emergency Department (ED) at Cho Ray Hospital. A few days prior, we had worked out an agreement with the hospital staff to come in for one evening shift. Although the ED physicians kept warning us that the shift would be incredibly hectic, I found that hard to believe given the enormous volume of patients we were seeing in the three to four hours that we were there each day. We accustomed to the scene: hospital beds constantly rotated in and out, often stacked in rows and side by side, nurses and lab technicians frantically running around, trying to get blood draws and administer medications. But none of that had prepared me for what was waiting for us that night.