Second Nuvance Health and University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Global Health Conference: Opening Remarks

Written by Majid Sadigh, MD, Trefz Family Endowed Chair in Global Health at Nuvance Health and Director of the Nuvance Health / University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Global Health Program


Welcome. Many of you have traveled very far, from within the United States and from around the world. Among us are deans of medical and nursing schools, directors of higher medical institutions, and leaders in medical education and research. Among us are also incredibly generous donors, leaders in countless fields, talented nursing staff, and community leaders.

Reflecting on My Global Health Journey During Medical School: Part II

Written by Jett Choquette, UVMLCOM Class of 2023


I moved to Connecticut for my clinical years of training (years three and four of medical school), as a member of the LCOM Connecticut campus 2023 class cohort. I became connected with Elvis Novas, a leader of the Dominican Community Center (DCC) in Danbury, CT. The DCC is a non-profit that seeks to empower the Dominican community and other Hispanic/Latinx/Latino communities in the Danbury, CT area.

Reflecting On My Global Health Journey During Medical School: Part I

Written by Jett Choquette, MD, University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Class of 2023


Soon, my time at the Larner College of Medicine at University of Vermont comes to a close and I begin a new adventure: internal medicine residency at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond, VA. I find myself reflecting on the role global health played throughout my medical school career and in my life so far, while becoming curious about how it will continue to be part of my training at VCU.

UNGA77: Creating an Empowerment Model in Global Health: Mitra Sadigh: Medical Students Leading the Way

Written by Mitra Sadigh, Writer, Editor, and Researcher at the Nuvance Health / University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Global Health Program


Everything we are speaking about today involves fighting the standard mold of white superiority, the white Savior complex, and coloniality. The fact that the ideas we discuss are often perceived as radical reflects the challenging nature of this work. We expose certain values to students who then go out into the world where they see something not only different, but often directly opposing.

UNGA77: Creating an Empowerment Model in Global Health: Mitra Sadigh: Preventing Harm

Written by Mitra Sadigh, Writer, Editor, and Researcher at the Nuvance Health / University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Global Health Program


Even with the most thoughtful and comprehensive preparation, we cannot prepare students for all aspects of the GH experience— something I think should be acknowledged in planning this ideal preparation. Much of the learning comes from the direct interactions between participants and individuals at host countries. We have to do our best to minimize harm.

“You Are My Brother, Why Do You Kill Me?”: Part III

Written by Rachel Laff, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine


Perhaps I was projecting, and there was a complete language and cultural gap, but this woman who showed us around the church felt like the most depressed person I had seen in Rwanda. More than once I saw her tear up. Her movements felt so heavy I wasn’t sure she would make it up the basement stairs, her affect so flat she barely made any facial expression when talking and she avoided every attempt I made to connect my eyes with hers.

“You Are My Brother, Why Do You Kill Me?”: Part II

Written by Rachel Laff, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine


On our last morning in Rwanda we went to Nyatama, a small village about 30 km south of Kigali, to visit a church that was one of the many sites of genocide massacres. When we arrived to the one-story dusty red brick building covered by a corrugated tin roof, we noticed a group of villagers seated in the backyard dressed in their Sunday best.

“You Are My Brother, Why Do You Kill Me?”: Part I

Written by Rachel Laff, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine July 1, 2007 Rwanda holds two public holidays commemorating the 1994 genocide. The national mourning period begins with Kwibuka (Remembrance) on April 7th, which marks the start of the genocide, and concludes with Liberation Day on July 4th. In …

Continue reading “You Are My Brother, Why Do You Kill Me?”: Part I

The Fruits of Bidirectionality in Vietnam

Written by Stephen Winter, MD, Senior Advisor for the Nuvance Health / University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Global Health Program


I am currently in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam working with our local partners to ensure the post-pandemic restart of our exchange programs operates as smoothly as possible. Being here again is exciting. We have seen some amazing things that illustrate the impact of our program.

Female Genital Cutting: Collaborating Toward Ending Harmful Practices: Part III

Written by Lauren Coritt, University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Class of 2023


In Canada, the Sexuality Education Research Center (SERC) began the Our Selves, Our Daughters project to promote harm reduction for sexual and reproductive health issues. Their first goal was to understand the community’s view on Female Genital Cutting (FCG). Community members were interviewed either in gender-segregated focus groups or as individuals. Thematic analysis of the data was conducted and presented to the groups before another round of analysis was performed with incorporation of community feedback.