In the World With COVID-19: Never Allow What I Cannot Do to Prevent What I Can Do

Written by Reverend Samuel Luboga, PhD, Co-Founder of the Homestay Model in Global Health, Uganda


The COVID-19 pandemic reminds me of the turbulent times of the 1970s and 1980s in Uganda. Health facilities almost grounded to a stop as many healthcare workers fled the country fearing for their lives. Moving about was so dangerous that traveling to the hospital at night or even seeking emergency care was out of the question. I stuck it out despite the danger to my own life and my family in order to be available to render whatever healthcare I could to the people of Uganda. I ran an evening clinic in my house to attend to anyone who needed emergency care, having risked his or her life to knock at my door at any time of night.

In the World With COVID-19: A Reflection on Miracles and Suffering

Written by Susan Nalugo, BBA, DMA, Coordinator of the Makerere University - Yale University (MUYU) Collaboration


On a personal level, I went through the lockdown ungrudgingly. I didn’t feel the effect of the pandemic until September 2020 when the prices of commodities skyrocketed. I did everything I could to protect myself from anxiety, stress, and distress. I spent three months completing an online Leadership and Management in Health course with the University of Washington. I taught myself how to make different foods, the most exciting of which was bread, as it won me an International television moment. I exercised daily. As a person of faith, I also spent quality time working on my spiritual growth.

In the World With COVID-19: A Consequence of Ecosystem Disruption

Written by Marcos Nuñez, MD, FICS, M.Ed, Dean Faculty Health Sciences Universidad Iberoamericana, Dominican Republic


As a consequence of humans pushing ecosystems and animals to the brink of extinction, we are dealing with the third novel coronavirus: SARS-CoV-2. Infection with this virus brings great diversity of clinical manifestations and complications, leaving patients to die isolated in hospitals, nursing homes, and healthcare centers far from their loved ones. From the end of 2019 until now, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to rage, leaving sickness, death, and tragedy in its wake while collateral damage takes a grave toll on economies as well as the mental and spiritual health of individuals in our societies.

In the World With COVID-19: COVID-19 Continues to Test Our Resilience and Flexibility

Jett Choquette, University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Class of 2023, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer in Paraguay, 2014-2016


When I joined the Peace Corps in Paraguay, we had two mantras: resilience and flexibility. Those words would take on an infinite number of meanings during my service. Spending twenty-seven months living and working in a new language and culture challenged me more than anything ever had. It also allowed me to forge some of the deepest friendships I’ve cultivated, and it pushed me to become a better self.

In the World With COVID-19: Swimming in a Sea of Uncertainty

Written by Jamidah Nakato, PhD, Department of Marketing and Management at Makerere University College of Business and Management Sciences


It is now official. The new normal has emerged from the ashes of COVID-19. In Uganda, many things were pushed to the back burner during the lockdown such as leisure activities, child vaccinations, healthcare visits, birth control, businesses, and education among others. There is hope that when a vaccine comes through we can return to the way things used to be. The questions range from, ‘Is this even possible?’, ‘What will life be after sanitizing, hand washing, and social distancing?’ ‘Will we cease doing all that or will this lifestyle stay with us for some time?’

In the World With COVID-19: My Illness Started Suddenly

Written by Gulshat Rashatovna, MD, Global Health Scholars Program alumnus from Russia


This is my experience of СOVID-19. I hope it will be useful for others. I am a 54-year-old female with no past medical history of diabetes or obesity. I had community-acquired pneumonia twice during the past two years, with the last episode nine months ago.

In the World With COVID-19: My One-Month Experience in the Fever Department

Written by Yang Lu, NP, a scholar who was scheduled to visit us in the U.S. in February 2020. Though his visit was postponed due to Covid-19, we are looking forward to his visit in the future. In the interim we have decided to report on changes in the healthcare environment related to Covid-19 in …

Continue reading In the World With COVID-19: My One-Month Experience in the Fever Department

In the World With COVID-19: A Busy, Safe, and Meaningful Life: Part II

Written by Mary Miller, MD, global citizen and friend of the Nuvance Health / University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Global Health Program


During the fall I registered voters, helped felons restore their voting rights, reminded many to vote, and told people where they could vote early, safely, and without waiting in line. I sat in a Black barber shop, socially distanced with a mask, and talked about the relevance of each person’s vote. Some Black men expressed fear of going to the polls. I volunteered at the polls on November 3rd, outside, with a mask. All was peaceful.

In the World With COVID-19: A Busy, Safe, and Meaningful Life: Part I

Written by Mary Miller, MD, global citizen and friend of the Nuvance Health / University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Global Health Program


COVID-19 is a global pandemic infecting millions and killing hundreds of thousands. Many people can choose protective measures to stay safe, but those at high risk may not be as fortunate.

In the World With COVID-19: A Clearer Lens: Part II

Written by Dylan Ochoa, Coordinator of the Nuvance Health / University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Global Health Program


The successful products of billion-dollar corporations, whose job is to keep us entertained, have led us to an unhealthy dependence on distractions. How do we cope when all our former recreational activities are no longer accessible? This is a question that I - and likely many others in the U.S. in particular - have repeatedly asked myself during this pandemic. What kind of lives do we lead without our usual leisurely distractions? We are left to ask what in our lives is meaningful and productive. I empathize with those who are feeling empty without external stimulants to draw their attention.