Reader Response: Upenyu Hunokosha

Written by Tendai Machingaidze, Associate Site Director for Zimbabwe University


What does it mean to have the ability to save a life and not do so? In Shona, we say “Upenyu hunokosha!” Life is precious! We cannot save the world, but we can certainly save a world – we can save a mother or a father or a child, and in so doing save a family, a world. But who is doing the saving? And how is it perceived?

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Reader Response: On Saving Life

Written by Dr. Mahsheed Khajavi, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine at Florida State University


This ethical dilemma and responses moved me to tears. However, I feel that allowing a human being to die a preventable death is not morally consistent with medical mission work. The very fact that we choose certain countries and see a limited number of patients- as many as humanly possible in the allotted time, which still leaves hundreds unattended- implies that we are already making a decision regarding the allocation of resources. To carry the argument of nonfinancial intervention is antithetical to what is already being implemented: choosing a country and a select group of patients who will receive care.

Reader Response: We Either Give Life Or We Take It

Written by Dr. Mahsheed Khajavi, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine at Florida State University


I think the most important word is "vulnerable." While reading this, I was thinking about the fundamental lack of acknowledgement  of each woman’s humanity. Perhaps the more appropriate word is simply humanity. While spoken language is often a barrier, there is an alternative, a universal language: smiling, holding a hand, sitting down and touching an arm, a cup of tea or glass of water…something to say, “You are not alone here. I am with you.”

Reader Response: Allowing Ourselves Grace

Written by Dr. Mahsheed Khajavi, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine at Florida State University


I read a recent piece by Nikolas Moring on Global Diaries and was moved. I could sense that this young man was disappointed, not in his trip but in his decision to return to the United States. I believe there is a difference between the words "trip" and "journey." The former implies a start and end point, a series of expectations from others and oneself which one must fulfill, and ultimately a return.