Roots of My Mango Sapling: Part II

Written by Justin Henningsen, PhD, University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Class of 2025


Most people I’ve run into since returning understandably ask about my experiences. I’ve found it difficult to encapsulate my thoughts and feelings in a few words. Though this may be due to an inherent ineloquence on my part, there is simply too much to try to convey. 

Roots of My Mango Sapling: Part I

Written by Justin Henningsen, PhD, University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Class of 2025


A few phrases are floating around in my mental milieu after returning: cultural competence, cultural humility, and the Dunning-Kruger effect. The latter is a concept from psychology which states that people who have some small degree of knowledge of a topic, but are not experts, tend to overestimate their knowledge.

The Katanga Community

Written by Hossein Akbarialiabad MD, MSc, Faculty Member at the Nuvance Health Global Health Academy


The Katanga community is located in the middle of Uganda’s capital, Kampala, between Makerere University and Mulago National Referral Hospital. It has a population of around 5,000, of which two-thirds do not have a national identity card. A volunteer-run organization, Katanga 4 Kids educates and cares for around 50 children ranging from three to seventeen years old who live on the street. One classroom serves the role of school, stage, playground, and church. They stay in two dormitories, with three to a bed and many on the floor.

Mwanamugimu Nutrition Clinic at Mulago

Written by William Hsu, University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Class of 2025


My second week in Uganda has continued to be a wonderful, welcoming, and incredibly informative learning experience. We have continued to see primarily orthopedic cases, but were able to visit the lab and imaging buildings alongside listening in on the HIV clinic, all of which have been very informative experiences.

Absorbing My Surroundings

Written by John (Jackson) Burke, University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine Class of 2025


What a week it has been since we arrived in Uganda. I think I am finally though the jet lag. I have a little more energy every day, yet I’m sure I will burn through it this weekend as we travel to Jinja to see the source of the Nile and explore the Mabira forest. My morale is much higher than it was when I arrived.

Boda-Bodas: A Bittersweet Transport Mode and a Silent Killer: Part II

Written by Matsiko Joshua, medical student at Makerere University College of Health Sciences


When we included indirect boda-boda involvements, we discovered that boda-bodas were involved in more than 50% of all casualty admissions, meaning these causes alone bring in more cases than all other emergency causes combined. This data also doesn’t include those that pass away on impact or at the site of the accident.

Boda-Bodas: A Bittersweet Transport Mode and a Silent Killer: Part I

Written by Matsiko Joshua, medical student at Makerere University College of Health Sciences


It is 8:36 PM when a 17-year-old male is rushed in a semi-conscious state with signs of multiple trauma after being involved in a boda-boda accident 18 hours ago. Primary and secondary surveys are immediately performed and the patient receives initial care to save his life.

In the World With COVID-19: The Sunset of 2021: Part II

Written by Sister Jane Frances, Director of St. Francis Naggalama Hospital, Uganda


As the sunset reflects the various patterns of life, one needs time for comfort, rest, reflection, and energy for a new beginning. The sun must set to bring the promise of a new dawn, a new hope, and tranquillity. I reflected on the true meaning of a fresh start that every sunrise of 2022 would bring.

Navigating a Community with Challenging Girl Child Education: Final Part

Written by Norah Namirembe, Assistant Coordinator of the International Office at Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS)


While volunteering in the International Office at Makerere University, I realized I could do many things at the same time and still save the day. This directly took me back to when I wanted to be a doctor. Though that dream was not practical given my financial standing, I still believed that I could have a profession within the health sector to serve my community, especially the girl child. With the thought that adding medical knowledge to my computer skills would make me a good professional with wide knowledge, I enrolled for an online Diploma in Nursing course.