You Are Not a Drop In the Ocean

Written by Dr. Majid Sadigh, Trefz Family Endowed Chair in Global Health at WCHN and Director of Global Health at University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine, and Mitra Sadigh, post-baccalaureate in premedical studies at University of Vermont


"You are not a drop in the ocean. You are the entire ocean in a drop." Rumi
Many medical students struggle with the sense of consuming resources, time, and space, without anything to give back during their global health elective. While these sentiments hold an element of truth, there is a bigger picture to bear in mind. You are part of a much greater system that consists of a multitude of components. WCHN/UVMCOM is deeply engaged in and committed to each international site. Sending medical students from the global North to the global South is only one part of a greater whole.

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Lights in a Village

Written by Dr. Fred Mandell, 1964 UVM medical alumnus and President of the UVM Medical Alumni Association


What better person to bring light than the student doctor? While it may seem like a small gesture, a light in the night’s darkness is a life changing event; young students can read, parents can work and families can share… all in the light rather than in the dark. This is more than just a bulb. The gift of light teaches the medical student to look beyond the algorism…to look at the quality of life of their global patients, to understand how they live and to understand the cultural concept of giving and receiving and to feel appreciation which transcends culture…and to feel it with the personal modesty and humility the culture demands. This is the beginning of the practice of the art of medicine.

CUGH 2014: The Development of Global Health Program at UVM

Written by Taylor Goller, '17 The 2016 Consortium of Universities for Global Health When I last attended this conference in 2014, I was impressed by the breadth of topics covered, including those outside the medical and public health fields. This year, though the conference opened with a keynote speech about the burgeoning field of planetary health, which broadens the scope of health to include environmental and climate concerns, I thought the actual content of the breakout sessions was much more narrowed on the fields of public health and academic medicine. However, this focus sparked discussion of many topics relevant to the development of the global health program at UVM.

Reconsidering Place and Purpose

Written by Tatiana Afanaseva, J1 Scholar from Russia Danbury, CT, USA I never expected the chance to visit the United States. I was so excited when I received the invitation that I began setting goals for the trip that very day: to become familiar with the health care system and medical education in the United States, to improve my clinical skills and English proficiency, and to adjust to a culturally different environment. I can proudly say that I achieved all these goals, and gained even more than I had expected.

“The Cost of Sickness and Health in Uganda” at UVMCOM’s Monthly Global Health Evening

Mackenzie Rigg, Hearst Connecticut Media Group reporter UVM College of Medicine Global Health Evening UVM College of Medicine's Global Health Evening transpires the first Monday of every month in the Sullivan Classroom, hosted by Dr. Majid Sadigh. This week featured Hearst Connecticut Media Group reporter Mackenzie Rigg who presented “The Cost of Sickness and Health in Uganda,” a first-hand account of the human suffering and survival she witnessed in Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda.

Development of a Global Women’s Health Curriculum for Medical Students & Residents

Written by UVM Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Anne Dougherty, M.D. ’09 When I was in medical school, I knew that my future lay in global health. At the time, I did not know that I would concentrate in maternal and reproductive health, just that I had a guiding desire to work with underserved populations and explore cross cultural differences in medicine.

Global Health Student Interest Group helps Students Prepare for Experiences Abroad

Written by Taylor Goller '17 Since starting school last fall it’s been amazing to me how willing, and even eager, so many students are to add more commitments and responsibilities on top of the already rigorous academic course load. In many ways, I think the student interest groups and other organizations help to balance the unfortunate monotony of the classroom and to maintain perspective on the ultimate goals of medical education, namely the support of humanity.