First Experience With Global Medicine

Written by Dr. Swati Patel, resident at the Connecticut Institute for Communities/Greater Danbury Internal Medicine Residency Program


I was interested in science and medicine at a young age. As I grew older, I realized how much I love interacting with people and building relationships. Medicine offered a career for both my talents and interests.  Although I had known about global health prior to college, it was during my undergraduate career that I first learned more about what it entailed. I was part of various school organizations, some of which would take students abroad and offer medical services, though I did not get the opportunity to participate in these  programs.

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Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Feelings of Guilt and Helplessness

Written by Dr. Stephen Winters, and Dr. Robert Kalyesubula, cofounder of the African Community Center for Social Sustainability, Nakaseke, Uganda


From a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North. Please leave us your feedback in the comments section below, and send us ethical dilemmas you would like to see discussed.

On Hosting Visiting Global Health Scholars

Written by Robyn Scatena, MD, Associate Director of Global Health at Norwalk Hospital


In the Norwalk Hospital Intensive Care Unit, we have the opportunity to host visiting global health scholars with some regularity. Many of our fellows and residents in the Intensive Care Unit have themselves participated in global health rotations. I asked our trainees to share some reflections on being global health “hosts.” They shared with me the many ways in which they have grown and benefitted.

Happyness: Advocating for Women’s Health in Rural Uganda

Written by Anne Dougherty, MD, Assistant Professor at UVM Robert Larner, MD College of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, and founder and director of the UVM Global Women’s Health Education Program


Let me tell you a story about Happyness. Happyness is a young woman living in rural Nakaseke district about sixty miles outside Kampala, Uganda’s capital. She just had her second baby who was born premature, and will likely not survive to his fifth birthday.  This pregnancy was conceived eight months after her last delivery, though we know that rapid repeat pregnancy, those conceived less than twenty-four months following a delivery, have dire consequences for both mother and baby.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Promoting Global Consciousness

Written by Dr. Stephen Winters, and Dr. Robert Kalyesubula, cofounder of the African Community Center for Social Sustainability, Nakaseke, Uganda


From a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North. Please leave us your feedback in the comments section below, and send us ethical dilemmas you would like to see discussed.
Many students and faculty visiting other countries often deal with culture shock. How can the stress and frustration of culture shock be mitigated? What steps have you taken as a leader in global health to address the challenges of dealing with diverse participant backgrounds and expectations?

Patience, Creativity, and Perseverance

Written by Katie Grenoble '20


The six weeks I spent with physicians and clinical officers in Uganda were a lesson in the fundamentals of medicine. In Uganda, doctors do not enjoy the luxury of being able to order any lab test they may need. Imaging is often performed off-site and rarely returned with an interpretation. Medications are purchased only if the patient can afford them, and the two EKG machines I saw seen were donated by Danbury Hospital in Connecticut. Doctors in Uganda must be exceptional at history taking and physical exams.

Light and Shadow Under an African Sky

Written by Tendai Machingaidze, medical student studying in Russia who helped support UVMLCOM/WCHN global health participants in Zimbabwe


It is not a small thing to leave the comfort of one’s country and home to venture to a foreign land for the sole purpose of expanding one’s knowledge. But, what better classroom is there to learn about global health than the world itself?

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Strengthening Global Partnerships

Written by Stephen Winter, MD, Director of Global Health at Norwalk Hospital, and Robert Kalyesubula, MD, cofounder of the African Community Center for Social Sustainability, Nakaseke, Uganda


From a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North. Please leave us your feedback in the comments section below, and send us ethical dilemmas you would like to see discussed.
There are many collaborations between the Global South and Global North, each with their own interests that must be met in order to make the collaboration fruitful. What are the key ingredients of a balanced collaboration, and what must both sides consider before setting one up?

Letter from the Editor: A Call to Write

Written by Mitra Sadigh, Writer/Editor at the UVMLCOM/WCHN Global Health Program and Editor of Global Health Diaries.


As reflective writers, we process our experiences and emergent feelings in the immediacy of writing them down, each word a wipe on a foggy mirror. In the midst of a slowly sharpening image, we uncover truths about ourselves, others, and the ways in which we exist in and interact with the world.

Dance of the Mentor-Mentee

Written by Mitra Sadigh, Writer/Editor at the UVMLCOM/WCHN Global Health Program, and Dr. Majid Sadigh, Trefz Family Endowed Chair in Global Health at WCHN and Director of Global Health at UVMLCOM


“Try not to resist the changes that come your way.
Instead, let life live through you.
And do not worry that your world is turning upside down.
How do you know that the side you are used to is better than the one to come?”
-Rumi

A supervisor is one who is in charge of overseeing and directing a project or people. The role of supervisor helps ensure smooth, proper conduction of workplace-related tasks. There is an understanding between supervisor and supervisee that the the one will somehow advise the other in workplace-related inquiries, but the relationship between supervisor and supervisee is not conventionally personal in nature. With so much to be learned in the realm of global health, and so much at stake- principally the physical and mental well-being of students, patients, and partner institutions- supervision may fall short in fully addressing student needs.