Reader Response: Upenyu Hunokosha

Written by Tendai Machingaidze, Associate Site Director for Zimbabwe University


What does it mean to have the ability to save a life and not do so? In Shona, we say “Upenyu hunokosha!” Life is precious! We cannot save the world, but we can certainly save a world – we can save a mother or a father or a child, and in so doing save a family, a world. But who is doing the saving? And how is it perceived?

Advertisements

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: The Monitoring of Reflections and Social Media Posts

Written by Dr. Stephen Winters, Director of Global Health at Norwalk Hospital, and Dr. Robert Kalyesubula, Founder of the African Community Center for Social Sustainability, Nakaseke, Uganda


From a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North. Please leave us your feedback in the comments section below, and send us ethical dilemmas you would like to see discussed.

Reader Response: On Saving Life

Written by Dr. Mahsheed Khajavi, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine at Florida State University


This ethical dilemma and responses moved me to tears. However, I feel that allowing a human being to die a preventable death is not morally consistent with medical mission work. The very fact that we choose certain countries and see a limited number of patients- as many as humanly possible in the allotted time, which still leaves hundreds unattended- implies that we are already making a decision regarding the allocation of resources. To carry the argument of nonfinancial intervention is antithetical to what is already being implemented: choosing a country and a select group of patients who will receive care.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Financial Barriers and Interventions

Written by Dr. Stephen Winters, and Dr. Robert Kalyesubula, Founder of the African Community Center for Social Sustainability, Nakaseke, Uganda


From a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North. Please leave us your feedback in the comments section below, and send us ethical dilemmas you would like to see discussed.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Gender and Culture

Written by Dr. Stephen Winters, and Dr. Robert Kalyesubula, Founder of the African Community Center for Social Sustainability, Nakaseke, Uganda


From a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North. Please leave us your feedback in the comments section below, and send us ethical dilemmas you would like to see discussed.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Bidirectional Safety

Written by Dr. Stephen Winters, and Dr. Robert Kalyesubula, Founder of the African Community Center for Social Sustainability, Nakaseke, Uganda


From a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North. Please leave us your feedback in the comments section below, and send us ethical dilemmas you would like to see discussed.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Assessing Student Success and Safety in Global Health Programs

Written by Dr. Stephen Winters, and Dr. Robert Kalyesubula, Founder of the African Community Center for Social Sustainability, Nakaseke, Uganda


From a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North. Please leave us your feedback in the comments section below, and send us ethical dilemmas you would like to see discussed.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Reader Response, from the Palliative Care Perspective- Part II

Written by Dr. Randi R. Diamond, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine and Director of the Liz Claiborne Center for Humanism in Medicine at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center


In response to a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North.
I have been following the excellent entries in Global Health Diaries on Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health. I am currently here in Uganda seeing palliative care patients and wanted to respond to a recent cases that others have written about, but from the perspective of a palliative care physician.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Reader Response, from the Palliative Care Perspective- Part I

Written by Dr. Randi R. Diamond, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine and Director of the Liz Claiborne Center for Humanism in Medicine at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center


In response to a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North.
I have been following the excellent entries in the Global Health Diaries on Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health. I am currently here in Uganda seeing palliative care patients and wanted to respond to a recent cases that others have written about, but from the perspective of a palliative care physician.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Reader Response

Written by Reverend Professor Luboga


In response to a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North.
It is always difficult for anyone to watch a patient, especially a young one, die. However, it can be particularly emotionally traumatic for a visiting student. I believe the student should desist from doing any such thing as prescribing medication.