Remembering Naggalama

Written by Nikolas Moring, '20


It’s been a few months since I returned from Naggalama. For better or for worse, I made the decision to leave early, and in doing so prioritized my health and well-being. It was not an easy choice. I spent many sleepless nights trying to figure out if I was about to squander away one of the best opportunities I’ve ever been given. It can be challenging to admit that you are not strong enough, not resilient enough, or just not cut out to complete the task set before you. That being said, I left a part of me with the people I met in Uganda, and a big chunk of that lives in St. Francis Hospital.

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Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Reader Response, from the Palliative Care Perspective

Written by Dr. Randi R. Diamond, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine and Director of the Liz Claiborne Center for Humanism in Medicine at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center


In response to a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North.
I have been following the excellent entries in the Global Health Diaries on Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health. I am currently here in Uganda seeing palliative care patients and wanted to respond to a recent cases that others have written about, but from the perspective of a palliative care physician.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Reader Response

Written by Reverend Professor Luboga


In response to a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North.
It is always difficult for anyone to watch a patient, especially a young one, die. However, it can be particularly emotionally traumatic for a visiting student. I believe the student should desist from doing any such thing as prescribing medication.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Promoting Global Consciousness

Written by Dr. Stephen Winters, and Dr. Robert Kalyesubula, cofounder of the African Community Center for Social Sustainability, Nakaseke, Uganda


From a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North. Please leave us your feedback in the comments section below, and send us ethical dilemmas you would like to see discussed.

I Wish Her Nothing But Peace

Written by Andrew Pham, '20


We were wrapping up our first rotation and the second week in the Emergency Department (ED) at Cho Ray Hospital. A few days prior, we had worked out an agreement with the hospital staff to come in for one evening shift. Although the ED physicians kept warning us that the shift would be incredibly hectic, I found that hard to believe given the enormous volume of patients we were seeing in the three to four hours that we were there each day. We accustomed to the scene: hospital beds constantly rotated in and out, often stacked in rows and side by side, nurses and lab technicians frantically running around, trying to get blood draws and administer medications. But none of that had prepared me for what was waiting for us that night.

First Experience With Global Medicine

Written by Dr. Swati Patel, resident at the Connecticut Institute for Communities/Greater Danbury Internal Medicine Residency Program


I was interested in science and medicine at a young age. As I grew older, I realized how much I love interacting with people and building relationships. Medicine offered a career for both my talents and interests.  Although I had known about global health prior to college, it was during my undergraduate career that I first learned more about what it entailed. I was part of various school organizations, some of which would take students abroad and offer medical services, though I did not get the opportunity to participate in these  programs.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Feelings of Guilt and Helplessness

Written by Dr. Stephen Winters, and Dr. Robert Kalyesubula, cofounder of the African Community Center for Social Sustainability, Nakaseke, Uganda


From a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North. Please leave us your feedback in the comments section below, and send us ethical dilemmas you would like to see discussed.

On Hosting Visiting Global Health Scholars

Written by Robyn Scatena, MD, Associate Director of Global Health at Norwalk Hospital


In the Norwalk Hospital Intensive Care Unit, we have the opportunity to host visiting global health scholars with some regularity. Many of our fellows and residents in the Intensive Care Unit have themselves participated in global health rotations. I asked our trainees to share some reflections on being global health “hosts.” They shared with me the many ways in which they have grown and benefitted.

Happyness: Advocating for Women’s Health in Rural Uganda

Written by Anne Dougherty, MD, Assistant Professor at UVM Robert Larner, MD College of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, and founder and director of the UVM Global Women’s Health Education Program


Let me tell you a story about Happyness. Happyness is a young woman living in rural Nakaseke district about sixty miles outside Kampala, Uganda’s capital. She just had her second baby who was born premature, and will likely not survive to his fifth birthday.  This pregnancy was conceived eight months after her last delivery, though we know that rapid repeat pregnancy, those conceived less than twenty-four months following a delivery, have dire consequences for both mother and baby.

Ethical Dilemmas in Global Health: Promoting Global Consciousness

Written by Dr. Stephen Winters, and Dr. Robert Kalyesubula, cofounder of the African Community Center for Social Sustainability, Nakaseke, Uganda


From a series of discussions about ethical dilemmas in global health, with responses from one global health leader in the Global South and one in the Global North. Please leave us your feedback in the comments section below, and send us ethical dilemmas you would like to see discussed.
Many students and faculty visiting other countries often deal with culture shock. How can the stress and frustration of culture shock be mitigated? What steps have you taken as a leader in global health to address the challenges of dealing with diverse participant backgrounds and expectations?